What not to do if you want to be happy

Smiley_Flickr_Candie_NDon’t blame others for problems: Even when their  problems could actually be attributed to another person, happy people tend to take responsibility for their problems. This puts the problem in their own control, rather than within the control of someone else.

Don’t overreact: Happy people don’t create drama.

Don’t feel trapped: Happy people don’t look at jobs or relationships as something that is stifling them.

Don’t focus on a single passion or relationship:  Happy people tend to have many different friends and relationships and varied interests and hobbies.

Don’t dwell on past failures: Unhappy people tend to rehash what they did wrong, while happy people move on.

Don’t use negative language: Happy people tend to avoid speaking negatively, even when something goes wrong.

Don’t spend time around unhappy people: Happy people gravitate toward others who are positive.

Don’t gossip: Happy people are more interested in talking about ideas than about other people.

Don’t procrastinate: Happy people make decisions, then take action.

—adapted from an article by Dan Baker, coauthor of What Happy People Know: How the New Science of Happiness Can Change
Your Life for the Better
(Rodale)

By Annemarie Scobey, from the pages of At Home with Our Faith, Claretian Publications’ print newsletter for parents on nurturing spirituality in the home. Winner of the Best in Class award in 2014 from the Associated Church Press, as well as a First Place General Excellence award from the Catholic Press Association for  four years running. Here’s a sample issue.

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